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If Left Untreated, Hyperkyphosis Can Kill You

Hyperkyphosis, also known as mid-back hunching, can negatively affect your nervous system and organs that it controls.

Ultimately, this can lead to restrictive pulmonary and cardiovascular disease, poor health and physical function, and even death, according to a study from the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Generally speaking, people who suffer from mid-back hunching, have an increased mortality rate, the study said. That statistic remained the same for all ages and sexes.

The study reported those with kyperkypthoic posture had a 2.4 times higher risk of dying from atherosclerosis, a form of cardiovascular disease. They also had a two times more likely chance to die from other pulmonary-related illnesses.

Chiropractors recommend corrective spinal treatment in order to fix the mid-back hunching and decrease mortality rate among patients with hyperkyphotic diagnoses.

Additionally, another study found proper chiropractic care reduced symptoms often associated with hyperkyphotic spinal curvatures including pain and reduced vital capacity. The treatments also improved the overall quality of life of the patients.

At Rowe Chiropractic, we perform state-of-the-art chiropractic techniques to fix spinal curvature associated with hyperkyphotic postures. Our doctors will look at your spinal biomechanics to identify a unique solution to correct your posture and spinal health.

If you’d like to learn more about how we can improve your posture and spinal health, please call us today at (212) 486-8888.

Citation

Kado et al., Hyperkyphotic Posture Predicts Mortality in Older Community-Dwelling Men and Women: A Prospective Study Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 2004 52 (10) 1662.

Oakley, Paul A., & Deed E. Harrison. (2018) REDUCING THORACIC HYPERKYPHOSIS SUBLUXATION DEFORMITY: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF CHIROPRACTIC BIOPHYSICS® METHODS EMPLOYED IN ITS STRUCTURAL IMPROVEMENT. Journal of Contemporary Chiropractic, 59-66. Retrieved from https://journal.parker.edu/index.php/jcc/article/view/32.